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Home » Nine Methods Of Cooking You Can Use If The Grid Goes Out

Nine Methods Of Cooking You Can Use If The Grid Goes Out

Nine Methods Of Cooking You Can Use If The Grid Goes Out

One of the many problems we will face if the grid ever goes down is cooking food. Today, most food preparation methods require electricity to work. Even someone who has a gas stove may find they are unusable in a crisis as gas can stop flowing. The only people able to continue using their stoves will be those who use propane, they will be able to run as long as they have a supply of food.

Nevertheless, the ability to cook your food is very important. You can’t just choose not to cook food. Besides warming it up and changing the chemistry of the food, cooking is required in order to destroy bacteria present on food to prevent it from infecting us. This is especially true when it comes to meat.

Barbecue Grill

Besides the household stove, the basic barbecue grill is probably the most popular form of cooking today. Most people own one for outdoor cookouts and preparing steak. These are great to use as a replacement for a stove if the grid goes down. You can place pots on the grill, and it works well, although they may become black on the outside.

While many grills work using propane, they can still be used with wood or charcoal. It may cause the gas burner to become damaged, but that can be replaced easily.

Fire Pit

If your patio has a fire pit, it can be used for cooking in a pinch. You may need to find a metal grill to place over it if it doesn’t already have one. You can find them anywhere that sells fire pits.

Cooking using a fire pit is similar to cooking over any other wood fire. Make sure you let the wood burn down to coals, it will be hotter while also being less likely to burn your food.

Fireplace

For over a hundred years after the United States began being settled, most people cooked in their fireplace. People placed pots directly in hot coals or suspended them over a fire using a metal frame. Meats can be broiled using a spit, similar to how rotisserie chicken is made today.

Wood Stove

Wood burning stoves gradually replaced fireplaces as the favored cooking location and continued to be used by settlers even after stoves became common in the East. The top of a wood stove is flat and intended for cooking. If your home has a wood burning stove for extra heat, you are all set and ready to cook if the grid ever goes down.

Camping Stove

Camp stoves, by their very nature, are meant to use in places without electricity. There are 3 main types, each with a specific type of fuel.

The most basic is the wood burning and is basically a portable box that you place wood into, then a pot on top.

Propane sources may be a problem as stores run out. It also isn’t effective with wood.

Dual fuel style stoves use either gasoline or a special fuel. Gasoline may be scarce in a crisis, however, it will probably easier for you to find than propane, especially if the camp stove requires those non-refillable specially-sized small tanks as the fuel source.

Oven

Solar cooking is great in the summer, when the weather is hot the last thing you want is a fire heating up your home even more. Unfortunately, it cooks quite slowly, so think of it like a Crockpot. However, when you get a little practice under your belt, they are effective and easy to use. There are 3 types of solar stove.

The most common is the reflective box. You can either buy one or make your own. This oven is basically a box with some flaps. The inside is coated completely with a reflective material, allowing sunlight to reflect onto the pot or pan that is placed inside. You can make these ovens more efficient by placing the pot into an oven-safe bag, like the ones used for cooking turkeys.

Parabolic reflectors are another option. The bigger they are, the better. These are often made from those huge old satellite antennas that used to be used for TV and are now obsolete. Simply coat the inside of the antenna with a reflective material. When you place the pot in the center at the receiver, all of the sun’s rays are focused onto it. You will have to fashion a device to hold the pot in place.

The most powerful solar oven you can make is using a Fresnel lens. These are most commonly seen as flat magnifying glasses made of plastic. Large Fresnel lenses used to be used behind the television screen on large units, so you can probably harvest one out of an old TV and then build a frame. The focal point is usually about 2 feet behind your lens. These can actually get hot enough to melt a penny.

Dutch Oven

Most of this list has been focused on pots or cooking meat. However, all of these methods can also be used to bake. Pioneers and colonists used Dutch ovens to bake. They would do this by placing their pie or bread in the oven, usually made of cast iron, and placing it in their fire’s coals. Then they would pile more coals on top. The contents cook while surrounded by heat. These also are useful for creating single-pot casserole-style meals.

Final Thoughts on Cooking

It’s always smart to have a couple of alternative methods for cooking available, as you never know what may cause your primary method to become unusable. Make sure you prepare ahead of time, both to ensure you can work your system and so you can practice with it. You don’t want to ruin your food in the midst of a crisis where supplies may be short. It’s better to make any mistakes and learn when food is abundant and easily available.

Survival Self Defense - How to protect yourself and your family
Survival Self Defense - How to protect yourself and your family

Discover the secrets to defending yourself and your family when disaster strikes!